Constants

What is a Fundamental Physical Constant?

fundamental physical constant is a physical quantity that is generally believed to be both universal in nature and constant in time. There are many fundamental physical constants that appear in equations today such as the Planck constant (h) to calculate photon energy, the Coulomb constant (k) to calculate the electromagnetic force, and the gravitational constant (G) for calculating gravitational force. Many of the constants are simply numbers that have been given letters to make an equation work.

Gravitational Constant
 

EWT – Only Five Wave Constants

All of the equations on this site can be derived with four universal wave constants and one constant that is a property of the electron for a total of five wave constants. They are:

  • Wave speed (the speed of light)
  • Wave amplitude (longitudinal)
  • Wavelength (longitudinal)
  • Density
  • Electron wave centers

Energy Diagram

The Four Universal Wave Constants
(volume is a variable – measuring the energy of a volume)

 

The values and units for these wave constants are found here. All other constants used in the equations can be derived from one of these five constants.

Of the known constants in physics, 22 fundamental physical constants have been simplified and derived by the energy wave constants. This includes the aforementioned proportionality constants (h, k, G) and many others. A summary table of all of the constants is found here, and then a page is dedicated to each one with the derivation in terms of wave constants.

 

Where is the Proof?

The proof of the wave constants used in energy wave theory is